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Rose Plants
Roses are best known as ornamental plants grown for their flowers in the garden and sometimes indoors. They have been also used for commercial perfumery and commercial cut flower crops. Some are used as landscape plants, for hedging and for other utilitarian purposes such as game cover. They also have minor medicinal uses.
Ruby Meidiland
 A wonderful low mounding hedge with abudant clusters of small, double ruby red blooms and glossy, rich green foliage. The mounding ground cover growing habit makes it an ideal companion for perennial and mixed borders, as well as for low growing hedge of foundation plantings.
White Meidiland Rose
   This Meidiland rose blooms from early spring until freezing cold, and what blooms! Three to four inches wide, pure white, the plentiful blooms make beautiful flower arrangements, especially arranged with reds and blues. Plant them about 4 feet apart, where they grow so low with foliage so thick it can stop weed growth beneath them. Planted more closely, they’re like a snowdrift on display, especially on slopes.
Fuchsia Meidiland
   A special addition to the winning Meidiland family, this rose grows just knee-high, and much like Scarlet Meidiland except it’s much lower growing and blooms earlier. It also spread more widely – up to 5 feet wide per plant! Some landscapers now use this rose as a groundcover! Two-tone, 2 inch blossoms are interesting. They’re dark red on the top of the petals, changing to cardinal red on the lower side. Blooms cover its abundant, glossy-green foliage throughout the entire growing season.
Mr. Lincoln Hybrid Tea Rose
  Other red roses are judged by this standard. Exceptional color, large fully double blooms, very fragrant.
Peace Hybrid Tea Rose
  So good it never goes out of style, more popular today then when first introduced. Very large, very full, mild fragrant blooms.

 John F. Kennedy Hybrid Tea Rose

Long, classic buds with an unusual greenish cast unfurl to sparkling white blooms. Mild-licorice fragrance.

 Rainbows End Sunblaze™ Rose

Deep yellow-blush roses are the “pot of gold” for your rainbow garden. Excellent for landscapes.
Hearty and Easy to Grow Sunblaze Roses
The most versatile roses you will find. Drought and disease tolerant, continuous flowering. Compact 15 to 18 inches tall. Well shaped plants that can be used to brighten up containers, flower boxes or as a perfect addition or replacement to fall Mums.

Lavender Sunblaze™ Rose

   An addition to the Sunblaze family this year in a beautiful shade of lavender-mauve. Well shaped blooms.
Hearty and Easy to Grow Sunblaze Roses
The most versatile roses you will find. Drought and disease tolerant, continuous flowering. Compact 15 to 18 inches tall. Well shaped plants that can be used to brighten up containers, flower boxes or as a perfect addition or replacement to fall Mums.
Blaze Rose
   My Father grew roses before I was born, and we still keep our rose gardens. Our Improved Blaze resists pests as it blooms and blooms from early summer to October – even in part shade. Plant Blaze to transform bare walls, fences, trellises, whatever. Grows into an excellent head-high fence.
Golden Showers Rose
   We’ve been asked for a yellow climber as hardy as our Blaze, and here it is. Golden Showers is a lovely companion planted with Blaze, or a blanket of foliage and golden color planted by itself. Plant it same as Blaze.
White Dawn Rose
   White Dawn Added for those who want something different in a climber. Fragrant, pure white gardenialike blooms. Considered by many as the best repeat blooming climber. Pure white color Your choice. Mix or match Blaze, Golden Showers, White Dawn.
Pink Knock Out
   A beautiful, powerful pink color on non-stop blooms. PPAF.
Knock Out® roses are a glowing example of disease resistance at it's best. Almost nothing stops these beauties from blooming, needs only 2-3 hours of sun a day. Bloom and growth show color from early spring until hard frosts. Carefree and thrives in humid climates whre most other plants require spraying and maintenance, does not need to be deadheaded. All five beautiful Knock Out® roses we offer are hardy to -25 degrees and grow 3' high and 3' wide. Beautiful roses that you will not want to be without for your garden or landscape.
Knock Out
   Deep, almost fluorescent cherry red blossoms, and dark, moss-green foliage will win your heart! PP#11836
Knock Out® roses are a glowing example of disease resistance at it's best. Almost nothing stops these beauties from blooming, needs only 2-3 hours of sun a day. Bloom and growth show color from early spring until hard frosts. Carefree and thrives in humid climates whre most other plants require spraying and maintenance, does not need to be deadheaded. All five beautiful Knock Out® roses we offer are hardy to -25 degrees and grow 3' high and 3' wide. Beautiful roses that you will not want to be without for your garden or landscape.
Blushing Pink Knock Out
   A light pink color changes into a remarkable shell pink as the blooms age. PPAF
Knock Out® roses are a glowing example of disease resistance at it's best. Almost nothing stops these beauties from blooming, needs only 2-3 hours of sun a day. Bloom and growth show color from early spring until hard frosts. Carefree and thrives in humid climates whre most other plants require spraying and maintenance, does not need to be deadheaded. All five beautiful Knock Out® roses we offer are hardy to -25 degrees and grow 3' high and 3' wide. Beautiful roses that you will not want to be without for your garden or landscape.
Rainbow Knock Out
  Shades of pink and yellow, medium beautiful blooms.
2007 AARS winner. PPAF
Knock Out® roses are a glowing example of disease resistance at it's best. Almost nothing stops these beauties from blooming, needs only 2-3 hours of sun a day. Bloom and growth show color from early spring until hard frosts. Carefree and thrives in humid climates whre most other plants require spraying and maintenance, does not need to be deadheaded. All five beautiful Knock Out® roses we offer are hardy to -25 degrees and grow 3' high and 3' wide. Beautiful roses that you will not want to be without for your garden or landscape.
Double Knock Out
  Sibling of Knock Out® with a sophisticated "true-rose" look and an abudance of small double flowers. PP#16,202
Knock Out® roses are a glowing example of disease resistance at it's best. Almost nothing stops these beauties from blooming, needs only 2-3 hours of sun a day. Bloom and growth show color from early spring until hard frosts. Carefree and thrives in humid climates whre most other plants require spraying and maintenance, does not need to be deadheaded. All five beautiful Knock Out® roses we offer are hardy to -25 degrees and grow 3' high and 3' wide. Beautiful roses that you will not want to be without for your garden or landscape.
Sunny Knock Out Rose
  Our Newsest Addition to the Knock Out Family.
Attractive dark foliage with yellow blooms and a sweet fragrance! Sunny has a slightly
Coral Drift Rose
  A cross between full size groundcover roses and miniatures, Drift® roses were created to increased consumer demand for smaller, ever-blooming plants. Repeat blooming from spring until frost with attractive foliage these naturally dwarf Drift® roses have a low spreading habit and are ideal for small gardens and combination planters. Plant to brighten up borders fill in empty spaces or to spread delicately around established plants. Good resistance to rust powdery mildew and black spot, they require no spraying except in the most black spot prone areas.
Red Drift Rose
  A cross between full size groundcover roses and miniatures, Drift® roses were created to increased consumer demand for smaller, ever-blooming plants. Repeat blooming from spring until frost with attractive foliage these naturally dwarf Drift® roses have a low spreading habit and are ideal for small gardens and combination planters. Plant to brighten up borders fill in empty spaces or to spread delicately around established plants. Good resistance to rust powdery mildew and black spot, they require no spraying except in the most black spot prone areas.
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Bonsai Plant
Bonsai is a process to produce a live dwarf specimen of a big tree. A bonsai should represent a mature and old tree, not only the age, but also the sign of natural wounds a plant should bear in wilderness. Bonsai first appeared almost 1000 years ago, in China. There it was called then, pun-sai. From there it went to Japan and there it evolved more. Bonsai is a mixture of poetic dream, handiwork of an artist and success of a horticulturist. Bonsai practically comes under artwork, the only difference from other art that, it is live art

BROOM STYLE

The broom style, or Hokidachi, is employed for trees with extensive, fine branching, often with species like elms. The trunk is straight and upright. It branches out in all directions about 1/3 of the way up the entire height of the tree. The branches and leaves form a ball-shaped crown which can also be very beautiful during the winter months.

CASCADE STYLE

Cascade-style, or Kengai, bonsai are modeled after trees which grow over water or on the sides of mountains. The apex, or tip of the tree in the Semi-cascade-style, or Han Kengai, bonsai extend just at or beneath the lip of the bonsai pot; the apex of a (full) cascade style falls below the base of the pot.

FOREST STYLE

The group or forest style, or Yose Ue, comprises a planting of several or many trees, and typically an odd number, in a bonsai pot. The trees are usually the same species, with a variety of heights employed to add visual interest and to reflect the age differences encountered in mature forests.

FORMAL UPRIGHT STYLE

The formal upright style, or Chokkan, is characterized by a straight, upright, tapering trunk. Branches progress regularly from the thickest and broadest at the bottom to the finest and shortest at the top.

GROWING IN A ROCK

The growing-in-a-rock, or Ishizuke, style means the roots of the tree are growing in soil contained within the cracks and holes of the rock. The rock may serve as a simple container, with the tree escaping the container and forming its own shape. Alternatively, the tree may show a definite relationship to the rock's shape, growing close to the rock and following its cotours.

INFORMAL UPRIGHT STYLE

The trunk and branches of the informal upright style, or Moyogi incorporate visible curves, but the apex of the informal upright is always located directly above the trunk's entry into the soil line. Similar to the formal upright style, branches generally progress regularly from largest at the bottom to smallest at the top, although this progression may be broken where the irregular shape of the trunk would make a branch abnormally prominent or obscure.

SHARI STYLE

The Shari style, or Sharimiki, style involves portraying a tree in its struggle to live while a significant part of its trunk is bare of bark. In nature, trees in the Sharimiki style are created by lightning or animals eating the bark.

LITERATI STYLE

The literati style, or Bunjin-gi, bonsai is characterized by a generally bare trunk line, with branches reduced to a minimum, and typically placed the top of a long, often contorted trunk. This style derives its name from the Chinese literati who created Chinese brush paintings like those found in the ancient text, The Mustard Seed Garden Manual of Painting. Their minimalist landscapes often depicted trees growing in harsh conditions, with contorted trunks and reduced foliage. In Japan, the literati style is known as bunjin-gi (???[84]?). (Bunjin is a translation of the Chinese phrase wenren meaning "scholars practiced in the arts" and gi is a derivative of the Japanese word, ki, for "tree").

RAFT STYLE

Raft-style, or Netsuranari, bonsai mimic a natural phenomenon that occurs when a tree topples onto its side, for example, from erosion or another natural force. Branches along the top side of the trunk continue to grow as a group of new trunks. Sometimes, roots will develop from buried portions of the trunk. Raft-style bonsai can have sinuous, straight-line, or slanting trunks, all giving the illusion that they are a group of separate trees—while actually being the branches of a tree planted on its side.

ROOT OVER ROCK STYLE

The root-over-rock style, or Sekijoju, is a style in which the roots of the tree are wrapped around a rock. The rock is at the base of the trunk, with the roots exposed to varying degrees as they traverse the rock and then descend into the soil below.

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Plants Reduce Polution
Carbon dioxide is sometimes referred to as pollution because raised levels of the gas in the atmosphere are affecting the Earth's climate

Yes, plants DO remove CO2 from the atmosphere. They use the process called photosynthesis, also called carbon assimilation, which uses light energy to produce organic compounds (cellulose,lipids, and various proteins) by combining carbon dioxide and water. Free oxygen is released as gas from the decomposition of water molecules, while the hydrogen is split into its protons and electrons and used to generate chemical energy via photophosphorylation.
NASA Study House Plants Clean Air
          NASA and the Associated Landscape Contractors of America (ALCA) have announced the findings of a 2-year study that suggest a sophisticated pollution-absorbing device: the common indoor plant may provide a natural way of helping combat “SICK BUILDING SYNDROME”.
 
          Research into the use of biological processes as a means of solving environmental problems, both on Earth and in space habitats, has been carried out for many years by Dr. Bill Wolverton, formerly a senior research scientist at NASA’s John C. Stennis Space Center, Bay St. Louis, Miss.
          Based on preliminary evaluations of the use of common indoor plants for indoor air purification and revitalization, ALCA joined NASA to fund a study using about a dozen popular varieties of ornamental plants to determine their effectiveness in removing several key pollutants associated with indoor air pollution. NASA research on indoor plants has found that living plants are so efficient at absorbing contaminants in the air that some will be launched into space as part of the biological life support system aboard future orbiting space stations
          While more research is needed, Wolverton says the study has shown that common indoor landscaping plants can remove certain pollutants from the indoor environment. “ We feel that future results will provide an even stronger argument that common indoor landscaping plants can be a very effective part of a system used to provide pollution free homes and work places. ” he concludes.
          Each plant type was placed in sealed, Plexiglas chambers in which chemicals were injected. Philodendron, spider plant and the golden pothos were labeled the most effective in removing formaldehyde molecules. Flowering plants such as gerbera daisy and chrysanthemums were rated superior in removing benzene from the chamber atmosphere. Other good performers are Dracaena Massangeana, Spathiphyllum, and Golden Pothos. “Plants take substances out of the air through the tiny openings in their leaves,” Wolverton said. “But research in our laboratories has determined that plant leaves, roots and soil bacteria are all important in removing trace levels of toxic vapors”.
          “Combining nature with technology can increase the effectiveness of plants in removing air pollutants,” he said. “A living air cleaner is created by combining activated carbon and a fan with a potted plant. The roots of the plant grow right in the carbon and slowly degrade the chemicals absorbed there,” Wolverton explains.
          NASA research has consistently shown that living, green and flowering plants can remove several toxic chemicals from the air in building interiors. You can use plants in your home or office to improve the quality of the air to make it a more pleasant place to live and work - where people feel better, perform better, any enjoy life more.
TOP 10 plants most effective in removing:
Formaldehyde, Benzene, and Carbon Monoxide from the air
 Bamboo Palm - Chamaedorea Seifritzii
 Chinese Evergreen - Aglaonema Modestum
 English Ivy Hedera Helix
 Gerbera Daisy Gerbera Jamesonii
 Janet Craig - Dracaena “Janet Craig”
 Marginata - Dracaena Marginata
 Mass cane/Corn Plant - Dracaena Massangeana
 Mother-in-Law’s Tongue Sansevieria Laurentii
 Pot Mum - Chrysantheium morifolium
 Peace Lily - Spathiphyllum
 Warneckii - Dracaena “Warneckii”
Chemicals Used
          Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a commercial product found in a wide variety of industrial uses. Over 90 percent of the TCE produced is used in the metal degreasing and dry cleaning industries. In addition, it is used in printing inks, paints, lacquers, varnishes, and adhesives. In 1975 the National Cancer Institute reported that an unusually high incidence of hepatocellular carcinomas was observed in mice given TCE by gastric intubation and now considers this chemical a potent liver carcinogen.
          Benzene is a very commonly used solvent and is also present in many common items including gasoline, inks, oils, paints, plastics, and rubber. In addition it is used in the manufacture of detergents, explosives, pharmaceuticals, and dyes.
          Benzene has long been known to irritate the skin and eyes. In addition, it has been shown to be mutagenic to bacterial cell culture and has shown embryotoxic activity and carcinogenicity in some tests. Evidence also exists that benzene may be a contributing factor in chromosomal aberrations and leukemia in humans. Repeated skin contact with benzene will cause drying, inflammation, blistering and dermatitis.
          Acute inhalation of high levels of benzene has been reported to cause dizziness, weakness, euphoria, headache, nausea, blurred vision, respiratory diseases, tremors, irregular heartbeat, liver and kidney damage, paralysis and unconsciousness. In anima tests inhalation of benzene led to cataract formation and diseases of the blood and lymphatic systems. Chronic exposure to even relatively low levels causes headaches, loss of appetite, drowsiness, nervousness, psychological disturbances and diseases of the blood system, including anemia and bone marrow diseases.
          Formaldehyde is a ubiquitous chemical found in virtually all indoor environments. The major sources which have been reported and publicized include urea-formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI) and particle board or pressed wood products used in manufacturing of the office furniture bought today. It is used in consumer paper products which have been treated with UF resins, including grocery bags, waxed papers, facial tissues and paper towels. Many common household cleaning agents contain formaldehyde. UF resins are used as stiffeners, wrinkle resisters, water repellents, fire retardants and adhesive binders in floor coverings, carpet backings and permanent-press clothes. Other sources of formaldehyde include heating and cooking fuels like natural gas, kerosene, and cigarette smoke.
          Formaldehyde irritates the mucous membranes of the eyes, nose and throat. It is also a highly reactive chemical which combines with protein and can cause allergic contact dermatitis. The most widely reported symptoms from exposure to high levels of this chemical include irritation of the eyes and headaches. Until recently, the most serious of the diseases attributed to formaldehyde exposure was asthma. However, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently conducted research which has caused formaldehyde to be strongly suspected of causing a rare type of throat cancer in long-term occupants of mobile homes.
PLANT:::: 1
Sansevieria or the "Snake plant".
MOTHER’S IN LAW tongue:
            There are about 60 varieties but only about 15 varieties are grown commercially. Of these the two most popular are laurentii and zeylanica. They are also known by another name that isn’t very "politically correct" the mother-in-law’s tongue.
          Stock plants are grown in beds out in the full sun. One very unusual thing about the production of these plants is that stock growers actually mow the tops of the plants to force them to produce new growth. Snake’s can be grown from leaf cuttings, clumps or rhizome cuttings.
          These plants are very versatile in both size and in growing conditions. You can find Sansevieria used in small dish gardens all the way up into 14" containers about 42" inches in height. They can handle full sun and look great on a patio during the spring and summer, but also can go inside into very low light. This plant can hang with the best of all low light plants.
          The one climatic condition which it will not tolerate is temperatures below 45 degrees for extended periods. When the plants are damaged it can show up slowly sometimes over a 1- 4 week period.

 

Janet Craig Costirican

 
Latin name:
Dracaena deremensis "Janet Craig Costarricanna"
Common name:
"Costarricanna Cane"
Light Requirement:
Medium to Low

"Janet Craig Costarricanna" is a sport of Draceana "Janet Craig" that took 10 years to develop into the plant you see here.
They are a fantastic alternative to the Dracaena Massangeama cane.
These plants are tall and columnar... perfect for a narrow corner or place several in a row to create a living wall.
We have them available from four foot plants to seven foot specimens.

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featured Products
Whether you are a professional landscaper, or in search of unique plants for your home, garden or office, Shubham can be your source for plants.

In addition to being centrally located and convenient our Garden Centre has ample space for a large display of wide variety of plants and garden accessories.